Zoloft sedating

Posted by / 01-Jun-2018 16:29

Hyperarousal is often the first sign of PTSD, and it’s directly linked to activation of the sympathetic nervous system. Arousal Symptoms: 1) Irritable or aggressive behavior 2) Self-destructive or reckless behavior 3) Hyper-vigilance 4) Exaggerated startle response 5) Problems in concentration 6) Sleep disturbance Remember your high school Biology class?

The sympathetic nervous system is the fight or flight part of our autonomic nervous system.

This is exactly what you want if you’re in a life-threatening situation.

But prolonged exposure to those same stress chemicals is harmful to your physical and mental health.

2) THE NEWEST TREATMENT IS THE STELLATE GANGLION BLOCK.

Common side effects that occur immediately are sleepiness and dizziness.

WHAT HAPPENS IN THE BRAIN: The colored areas in this brain highlight the parts involved in emotion.

The long green part is the hippocampus and is important in memory recall.

In your brain, they inflame the amygdala (increasing the intensity of sadness, fear, and anger) and block the hippocampus from laying down memory tracks.

If these chemicals continue for any length of time, the hippocampus shrinks and the amygdala enlarges. Parts of the cortex (the gray area on the outside that does most of your thinking) are also affected, including the VMPF (ventral medial prefrontal cortex), which controls emotions by calming the amygdala.

zoloft sedating-50zoloft sedating-66zoloft sedating-31

One thought on “zoloft sedating”

  1. This very individual and personal aspect can sometimes produce a lot of public discussion. However, many people soon saw Asian intermarriage with Whites as a threat to American society. had formal laws on their books that prohibited non-Whites from marrying Whites.

  2. Scott's Thelma and Louise, with a sparkling screenplay by the first-time writer Callie Khouri, is a surprise on this and many other scores. Scott (best known for majestically moody action films like Alien, Blade Runner and Black Rain) for exuberant comedy, and for vibrant American imagery, notwithstanding his English roots.